Stained Glass Stare
shanniballecter:

geekscoutcookies:

design-is-fine:

Sony, Record player Flamingo PS-F9, 1982. Via Museum für Gestaltung, Zürich.

I WOULD HAVE THIS IN MY HOUSE RIGHT NOW

Need

shanniballecter:

geekscoutcookies:

design-is-fine:

Sony, Record player Flamingo PS-F9, 1982. Via Museum für Gestaltung, Zürich.

I WOULD HAVE THIS IN MY HOUSE RIGHT NOW

Need

lastrealindians:

Native rap star Frank Waln to perform for ESPN show on R-word*

CHICAGO – If you haven’t heard the uproar over the Washington R******s and the push to #changethename, then you haven’t been paying attention to social media or you’ve been living under a rock. Recently, ex-Bears head coach Mike Ditka said, “R****** name change is so stupid, it’s appalling.” While on the flip side, NFL sportscasters Phil Simms and Tony Dungy have said they will only refer to the Washington team as Washington and not the R-word.

ESPN came to the American Indian Center of Chicago, to film (Indian-famous soon to be real-famous) rap star Frank Waln performing a new song for the show, “Outside the Lines.” The shoot was done on the stage at Chicago’s American Indian Center with Robert Wapahi’s mural beautifully lit up in the background. This was a closed shoot and, according to the director, the show is to be focused on the Washington R-word and the debate over a name change. After filming the video, Chi-Nations had the chance to catch up with Frank to talk about how the issue is affecting the youth and he had a lot to say. (See video below.)

READ MORE HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/native-rap-star-frank-waln-to-perform-for-espn-show-on-r-word/

lastrealindians:

Native rap star Frank Waln to perform for ESPN show on R-word*

CHICAGO – If you haven’t heard the uproar over the Washington R******s and the push to #changethename, then you haven’t been paying attention to social media or you’ve been living under a rock. Recently, ex-Bears head coach Mike Ditka said, “R****** name change is so stupid, it’s appalling.” While on the flip side, NFL sportscasters Phil Simms and Tony Dungy have said they will only refer to the Washington team as Washington and not the R-word.

ESPN came to the American Indian Center of Chicago, to film (Indian-famous soon to be real-famous) rap star Frank Waln performing a new song for the show, “Outside the Lines.” The shoot was done on the stage at Chicago’s American Indian Center with Robert Wapahi’s mural beautifully lit up in the background. This was a closed shoot and, according to the director, the show is to be focused on the Washington R-word and the debate over a name change. After filming the video, Chi-Nations had the chance to catch up with Frank to talk about how the issue is affecting the youth and he had a lot to say. (See video below.)

READ MORE HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/native-rap-star-frank-waln-to-perform-for-espn-show-on-r-word/

softerworld:

A Softer World: 1146
(now you will never know)
buy this print

brushstrokes:

(Newser) – Three-quarters of white Americans lack any minority friends, a survey finds: Their social networks, according to the Public Religion Research Institute, are “entirely white.” The average white person with 100 friends, meanwhile, would have a single black friend, a single Latino friend, one Asian friend, and one mixed-race friend, the Washington Post reports. A black person with 100 friends would typically have eight white friends, per the survey. The data seem to prove the Chris Rock joke that “all my black friends have a bunch of white friends—and all my white friends have one black friend,” Christopher Ingraham notes at the Post.

Among black Americans, about 65% have social networks consisting of only black people, the survey finds, per the Atlantic. For Hispanic Americans, the figure is 46%. The homogeneity among white people might be explained in part by our habit of making friends who are similar to us, Ingraham notes. There’s also the persistent segregation in our communities, notes Zak Cheney-Rice at News.Mic: Fueled by housing discrimination and poverty, “geographical divides between white and black Americans are a defining characteristic of most US cities,” he writes. Adds Ingraham: “The implication of these findings is that when we talk about race in our personal lives, we are by and large discussing it with people who look like us.”

Never place a rabbit on its back.

queendecuisine:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn

OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).
ANYWAY.
Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.
On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.
Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.
After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.
Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.
And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS IS THE MAN.

queendecuisine:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn


OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).

ANYWAY.

Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.

On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.

Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.

After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.

Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.

And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS IS THE MAN.

I’m so uncool I read my own online fiction during my lunch break.

sixpenceee:

The Melted Cassette Tape Skeletons of Brain Dettmer